We at the CDC Expand Access to Bivalent COVID Vaccine to Children 6 Months and Older

(Reuters) – The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Friday approved the COVID-19 vaccine for use in children 6 months to 5 years old against the original coronavirus and the Omicron subvariant.

The development comes a day after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved an update from Moderna and Pfizer and its partner BioNTech for use in children 6 months and older.

Children 6 months to 5 years old are now eligible to receive a bivalent Moderna booster dose 2 months after the last primary COVID-19 vaccination.

The updated Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine for children 6 months to 4 years old should only be given as a third dose for people who have not yet completed their primary COVID-19 vaccination.

The vaccine for young children in the United States was only approved in June this year, and it is the last group that can be considered for vaccination

vaccination.

Only 2.9 percent of children under age 2 and less than 5 percent of eligible children ages 2 to 4 had completed their primary series by Dec. 7, according to the CDC.

(Reporting by Raghav Mahobe, Bengaluru; Editing by Shounak Dasgupta)

Washington DC. – The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Friday authorized the use of the COVID-19 vaccine against the original coronavirus and the omicron subvariant in children 6 months to 5 years old.

The development comes a day after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved an update from Moderna and Pfizer and its partner BioNTech for use in children 6 months and older.

Children 6 months to 5 years old are now eligible to receive the bivalent Moderna booster 2 months after the last primary dose of COVID-19.
Pfizer/BioNTech’s updated vaccine for children aged 6 months through 4 years can be given only as the third dose for those who are yet to complete their primary COVID-19 vaccinations.

Vaccines for young children in the United States were only approved in June this year, making them the last group to become eligible for vaccination.

Data from the CDC shows only 2.9% children under the age of 2 years, and less than 5% of children aged 2 to 4 years, who are eligible have completed their primary vaccination series as of Dec. 7.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Friday signed off on the use of bivalent COVID-19 vaccines for children ages 6 months through 5 years.

The move, following the Food and Drug Administration’s greenlight on Thursday, will allow the updated vaccines to be administered to the youngest population starting immediately.

he U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Friday expanded the use of COVID-19 vaccines that target both the original coronavirus and Omicron sub-variants to include children aged 6 months through 5 years.

The development comes a day after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration authorized the updated shots from Moderna as well as Pfizer and its partner BioNTech for use in children as young as 6 months.
While the vaccines are authorized in adults as a booster only, it’s a little more complicated for young kids.

Children ages 6 months through 5 years who previously completed a two-dose Moderna primary series are eligible to receive a Moderna bivalent booster 2 months after their final primary series dose.

Children ages 6 months through 4 years who are currently completing a three-dose Pfizer primary series will receive a Pfizer bivalent vaccine as their third primary dose.
On December 9th, 2022, CDC expanded the use of updated (bivalent) COVID-19 vaccines for children ages 6 months-5 years. We will update this page with more information on where to get these vaccines once available. To learn more about updated (bivalent) vaccines for this age group, see the CDC and FDA media statements.
Both the flu and COVID-19 vaccines can be given at the same visit. More on flu shots and prevention tips
State-run walk-in clinics offer both updated boosters and flu vaccines (for those under 65 years), with more locations being added.
State-run walk-in clinics are not able to offer flu vaccines to adults 65 and older. Contact your pharmacy or doctor’s office directly for details on available vaccines and scheduling.

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Vermonters ages 6 months and older are now eligible for COVID-19 vaccines. Getting vaccinated against COVID-19 is the safer way to build protection from serious illness–even for those who have already had COVID-19. Learn more about COVID-19 vaccines (CDC)

COVID-19 vaccines are free and widely available. Anyone can get vaccinated in Vermont, including those who live in another state, are non-U.S. citizens, or who have no insurance. See Vermont’s current vaccine rates

The vaccine authorization comes amid a rise in COVID-19 infections as well as one of the earliest surges of influenza.

The youngest children have only been eligible for a COVID-19 vaccine since June, making them the last group to become eligible for vaccination.

But the vast majority of children in this age group have not received any doses of a COVID-19 vaccine, which is worrying administration health officials.

The CDC said it is working to increase parent and provider confidence in COVID-19 vaccines and improve uptake among the 95 percent of children who are either not vaccinated or who have not completed the primary series.

“As we spend more time indoors during the holiday season and winter months, I encourage parents of eligible children to get one of these free updated COVID-19 vaccines to help keep their families safe,” Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra said in a statement.

“COVID-19 vaccines remain our best defense against the most devastating health consequences of the virus, and we encourage all those eligible to stay up to date with their vaccinations, or get vaccinated if they have not yet done so,” Becerra said.

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